flutiebear:

jessicalprice:

teland:

gailsimone:

badguyshavetheworstaim:

a comic done by christianne benedict, posted on the womanthology art forum. brilliant!

YES. Jesus, thank you.
I cannot tell you how many times I have had to point out what the audience at conventions actually LOOKS like to people in the industry. They can do signings in a booth full of every kind of person all day long, every color, every size, every orientation and more, and STILL go online and talk about how only white straight males read comics.
IT IS PROFOUNDLY UNTRUE AND INSULTINGLY IGNORANT.

"The Women Men Don’t See" — James Tiptree, Jr. (AKA Rebecca Sheldon — thanks, buggeryisthegenus)
And really — the *everyone* men don’t see, when you get right down to it. They don’t see us, they’re convinced we don’t spend money — not on the merch they want to make, anyway — and, if we make so much noise that they have to acknowledge us anyway?
Well, we’re not “real” fans.
*rolls eyes so hard they get stuck*

There’s also some interesting data I posted about here; among younger con attendees for comics and games conventions, attendance is split 50-50 between men and women. Unfortunately they didn’t have data on race or orientation, but it’s still pretty telling: your audience is not who you keep saying it is, comics industry.
I work for a tabletop roleplaying game company. We make continual efforts to be inclusive in terms of gender, race, orientation, etc. — half our iconic characters (the ones in our marketing, comic books, audio dramas, used for the art in our rulebooks, etc.) are female, and two of them are openly in a same-sex relationship, one is a transwoman, etc. We have been the top-selling tabletop RPG for a while now (yes, that includes D&D). (See, for example, the ICV2 sales reports.) 
What’s probably the boomingest type of scifi right now? Dystopian YA fiction (e.g. these series). YA sales grew by 43.7% just in January of 2014 (compare adult fiction and nonfiction at 2.8%). This is a genre dominated by female writers and (young) female readers. 
What was the top-grossing movie of 2013? The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, based a book written by a woman, about a young woman. #2 was Iron Man 3, which starred a dude, but also had several prominent female characters, two of which spent a considerable amount of screen time talking to each other about something other than a man (which screenwriting classes claim will immediately make all the men in the audience flee the theater). Oh, and at #3? Frozen, a movie about two sisters. Highest-grossing animated film of all time. Written by a woman. Directed by a woman. About women. (Oh, and Frozen's Broadway sister, Wicked, is the third-highest grossing musical.)
And yet we keep hearing things like  this:
“Guardians of the Galaxy is also the first Marvel movie to be written by a woman, screenwriter Nicole Perlman. In a recent interview with TIME magazine, Perlman described the trouble she had persuading studios to trust a woman to write sci-fi…”
It is manifestly obvious that women buy games, buy comics, and see scifi/fantasy movies. It is manifestly obvious that women can write and direct and star in top-selling scifi and fantasy and comics-based movies. It is manifestly obvious that women can write best-selling scifi novels, and that women can drive the sales that make them best-sellers. It is manifestly obvious that putting non-chainmail-bikini-ed women on the cover of your game doesn’t hurt sales, and may actually help them. (That’s actually true outside of games, too: sex doesn’t necessarily sell, and may actually reduce brand recall.)
So you have to ask yourself, why the hell are comics companies and game companies and movie studios so afraid of women?
Because the idea that it’s for business reasons is, not to put too fine a point on it, bullshit.

IMO, keeping the conversation focused on “Why Don’t Women…[buy comics/watch sci fi/write fantasy/play games/etc].?” serves mostly to reinforce women’s marginalization within these geek circles. I mean, it’s not women participating in these groups asking “Why Don’t Women…?” because we’re living proof that Women Do, right?
So the question “Why Don’t Women…?” reminds us that, no matter what the actual reality of the situation, the general consensus is that women are outsiders; that we should always expect to have to prove ourselves and our legitimacy to industry gatekeepers. By forcing everyone to keep coming back to this asinine question, it keeps women on the defensive, rather than letting us move onto something, anything, more interesting — like, say, our thoughts and opinions on the subject matter in question.
And you know, to the industry insiders, it doesn’t matter that the actual evidence contradicts their “Women Don’t [Fill In the Blank]” assertion. Readership figures, dollars spent, sales accumulated — on the ground facts — totes irrelevant. If it did matter, then they’d have to start making different choices, I think, and inertia is a powerful beast for a large media producer.
Yet by asking “Why Don’t Women…?”, by lamenting the fact that Women Don’t [x],  TPTB can make a big show of seeming like they’re interested in solving the problem — even though female readership/viewership/playership/etc. numbers prove the problem doesn’t really exist, at least not in the way they’re framing it — without actually requiring TPTB to make any changes to their business strategy. They get all the brownie points of caring about diversity, without having to actually put any money where their mouth is. 

flutiebear:

jessicalprice:

teland:

gailsimone:

badguyshavetheworstaim:

a comic done by christianne benedict, posted on the womanthology art forum. brilliant!

YES. Jesus, thank you.

I cannot tell you how many times I have had to point out what the audience at conventions actually LOOKS like to people in the industry. They can do signings in a booth full of every kind of person all day long, every color, every size, every orientation and more, and STILL go online and talk about how only white straight males read comics.

IT IS PROFOUNDLY UNTRUE AND INSULTINGLY IGNORANT.

"The Women Men Don’t See" — James Tiptree, Jr. (AKA Rebecca Sheldon — thanks, buggeryisthegenus)

And really — the *everyone* men don’t see, when you get right down to it. They don’t see us, they’re convinced we don’t spend money — not on the merch they want to make, anyway — and, if we make so much noise that they have to acknowledge us anyway?

Well, we’re not “real” fans.

*rolls eyes so hard they get stuck*

There’s also some interesting data I posted about here; among younger con attendees for comics and games conventions, attendance is split 50-50 between men and women. Unfortunately they didn’t have data on race or orientation, but it’s still pretty telling: your audience is not who you keep saying it is, comics industry.

I work for a tabletop roleplaying game company. We make continual efforts to be inclusive in terms of gender, race, orientation, etc. — half our iconic characters (the ones in our marketing, comic books, audio dramas, used for the art in our rulebooks, etc.) are female, and two of them are openly in a same-sex relationship, one is a transwoman, etc. We have been the top-selling tabletop RPG for a while now (yes, that includes D&D). (See, for example, the ICV2 sales reports.) 

What’s probably the boomingest type of scifi right now? Dystopian YA fiction (e.g. these series). YA sales grew by 43.7% just in January of 2014 (compare adult fiction and nonfiction at 2.8%). This is a genre dominated by female writers and (young) female readers. 

What was the top-grossing movie of 2013? The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, based a book written by a woman, about a young woman. #2 was Iron Man 3, which starred a dude, but also had several prominent female characters, two of which spent a considerable amount of screen time talking to each other about something other than a man (which screenwriting classes claim will immediately make all the men in the audience flee the theater). Oh, and at #3? Frozen, a movie about two sisters. Highest-grossing animated film of all time. Written by a woman. Directed by a woman. About women. (Oh, and Frozen's Broadway sister, Wicked, is the third-highest grossing musical.)

And yet we keep hearing things like  this:

Guardians of the Galaxy is also the first Marvel movie to be written by a woman, screenwriter Nicole Perlman. In a recent interview with TIME magazine, Perlman described the trouble she had persuading studios to trust a woman to write sci-fi…”

It is manifestly obvious that women buy games, buy comics, and see scifi/fantasy movies. It is manifestly obvious that women can write and direct and star in top-selling scifi and fantasy and comics-based movies. It is manifestly obvious that women can write best-selling scifi novels, and that women can drive the sales that make them best-sellers. It is manifestly obvious that putting non-chainmail-bikini-ed women on the cover of your game doesn’t hurt sales, and may actually help them. (That’s actually true outside of games, too: sex doesn’t necessarily sell, and may actually reduce brand recall.)

So you have to ask yourself, why the hell are comics companies and game companies and movie studios so afraid of women?

Because the idea that it’s for business reasons is, not to put too fine a point on it, bullshit.

IMO, keeping the conversation focused on “Why Don’t Women…[buy comics/watch sci fi/write fantasy/play games/etc].?” serves mostly to reinforce women’s marginalization within these geek circles. I mean, it’s not women participating in these groups asking “Why Don’t Women…?” because we’re living proof that Women Do, right?

So the question “Why Don’t Women…?” reminds us that, no matter what the actual reality of the situation, the general consensus is that women are outsiders; that we should always expect to have to prove ourselves and our legitimacy to industry gatekeepers. By forcing everyone to keep coming back to this asinine question, it keeps women on the defensive, rather than letting us move onto something, anything, more interesting — like, say, our thoughts and opinions on the subject matter in question.

And you know, to the industry insiders, it doesn’t matter that the actual evidence contradicts their “Women Don’t [Fill In the Blank]” assertion. Readership figures, dollars spent, sales accumulated — on the ground facts — totes irrelevant. If it did matter, then they’d have to start making different choices, I think, and inertia is a powerful beast for a large media producer.

Yet by asking “Why Don’t Women…?”, by lamenting the fact that Women Don’t [x],  TPTB can make a big show of seeming like they’re interested in solving the problem — even though female readership/viewership/playership/etc. numbers prove the problem doesn’t really exist, at least not in the way they’re framing it — without actually requiring TPTB to make any changes to their business strategy. They get all the brownie points of caring about diversity, without having to actually put any money where their mouth is. 

(Source: lizlem0nparty, via librarian-in-waiting)

comics

readaroundtherosie:

IT’S TIME FOR ANOTHER GIVEAWAY!

RULES:

  1. Be following me readaroundtherosie 
  2. Prizes will be sent via the book depository so if they don’t ship to your country, I’m really really sorry. But they ship to over 150 countries worldwide, so hopefully that includes you
  3. like, reblog, do whatever as many times as you like- try not to spam people
  4. no giveaway blogs thank you
  5. End date: November 1st 2014, midnight AEST
  6. you will need to give me your address to send them don’t worry I won’t do anything else with it, I’m far too lazy 

PRIZES:

  1. THERE WILL BE 3 WINNERS 
  2. Each winner will receive 1 hardcover OR two paperbacks of their choice from the books above
  3. considering HEIR OF FIRE is currently my favourite book of the year thus far I wanted to celebrate that and all my other favs so far so these are my favourite reads 
  4. you can choose any of the books from the series if you already have the first one, or even from a spin off series (like Bloodlines instead of Vampire Academy)

GOOD LUCK, GET REBLOGGING

(via youngadultread)

giveaway

Sometimes on a second read through of a book that I absolutely loved, I’ll come across things that I’m more critical of on closer examination. And because I’m me, I inwardly cringe, because in the meantime I’ve gushed about it and recommended it to people, and I’m convinced they’re going to read it on my recommendation and judge me for it.

ruth talks about her fascinating life... reading books

Goals for tomorrow:

- Finish painting my comics box. It’s been sitting half painted for almost a month now.
- Go over to my uncle’s house and finally put the design on the Captain Marvel shirt with the heat press.
- Read (obviously)

(I really should be: cleaning, signing up for the GRE, looking into classes, emailing old professors, etc, but I burst into tears at work yesterday thinking about it all, so I might give myself a day or two)

ruth talks about her fascinating life...